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Moodindigo: Stop feeling important

That time is upon us when the ugly head of VVIP racism raises its head yet again. It reminds me of something Machiavelli said in his expositions on statecraft. Consumption (disease), he said, was difficult to diagnose in its early stage but easy to cure. However, subsequently it became easy to diagnose but difficult to cure (paraphrasing). I would extend this further in the context of VVIP racism, for it could very well apply to this malaise as well. Furthermore, it is also contagious.

MONEYBALL: Midfield Manoeuvres in ISL Land

It has been a fortnight where cricket dominated news and the country celebrated yet another glorious achievement as the national team reached the finals of the Champions Trophy to play arch rivals Pakistan for the trophy in a win-win clash for everyone. Especially the broadcaster Star Sports, who has had to see a number of washed-out matches, and even an India loss to the unfancied Sri Lankan team, which would have given nightmares to many an executive. The very thought that India might not make the semi-finals would have thrown all revenue calculations haywire.

RISKFACTOR: Feel free to fail

Continuous learning is the hallmark of growth and development and our own experiences is one treasure that we can tap on for this learning process. Let me ask you a question: where do you learn more from — your successes or failures? Invariably, we would say that understanding both — why we succeeded and why we failed — are equally important. While the former tells us what to continue doing, the latter is about what to avoid the next time we are in similar situations.

Ruminations: The Republic of bias

For a cricket-playing nation, a cricket match is a good time to understand bias. It is every nation’s big hypernationalism. Victory has to be earned on the ground but the acoustics around the match become about as significant as the match itself. What the players say about one another, what the fans say, the twitter wars, the taunts and sometimes the physical clashes reach a pitch that appear to give new powers to the teams. The playing arena inevitably assumes a gladiatorial setting.

Ruminations: The Republic of bias

For a cricket-playing nation, a cricket match is a good time to understand bias. It is every nation’s big hypernationalism. Victory has to be earned on the ground but the acoustics around the match become about as significant as the match itself. What the players say about one another, what the fans say, the twitter wars, the taunts and sometimes the physical clashes reach a pitch that appear to give new powers to the teams. The playing arena inevitably assumes a gladiatorial setting.

Spy’s eye: Radicals extend battlefield

The two recent attacks by ISIS converts in London in which the same modus operandi, overrunning unsuspecting civilians with a truck was used, the 'lone wolf' bombing at a music concert at Birmingham and a host of warnings of possible attacks by terrorists of Islamic State in France, Germany and Spain, are signs that the area of operation of the ‘foot soldiers’ of radical Islam has expanded across Europe.

gizmo geek: Vinyl is dead, long live vinyl

Old, they say, is gold. Which probably explains the thriving antique industry. But when retro meets modern-day technology, it can be a very different story altogether, some might even say magical. One company has made quite an art form of recreating retro musical wonders with a touch of the new—Crosley Radio.

Newsmaker: Great Survivor

When Bharatiya Janata Party patriarch Lal Krishna Advani suggested that Madhya Pradesh’s three-time BJP chief minister Shivraj Singh Chouhan could also be the party's candidate for prime ministership in 2014, it had seemed at once an odd suggestion but then, not an implausible one either. Odd because compared with Narendra Modi’s nationwide appeal, his standing as Hindu Hriday Samrat, and his flowing oratory, Chouhan had seemed dour, nitpicking and too much of a local leader.

Fifth Columnist:Look West

As far as the question of China is concerned, Nepal’s former prime minister and the country’s most popular Maoist leader Pushpa Kumar Dahal or Prachanda told me in an interview in 2014, “With India we have an open border and a common history and culture…it cannot be compared to China.”
With India we have so many similarities that there are problems, he added with a laugh. Prachanda, who spent many years of his underground life in various parts of India battling his country’s monarchy, knows what he is saying.

FREEDOM FILES: Nehru's stalking horse

The Indian National Congress or one of its principals Jawaharlal Nehru had a B Team in place to extend its political activism across the spectrum of the Princely States, which were aligned with the British through the inexorable umbilical cord of treaty relations under the aegis of Paramountcy.

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