Ambuja Realty to set up boutique hotels

Company’s first resort hotel called Ganga Kutir comes up in Raichak near Kolkata

Ambuja Realty to set up boutique hotels
The river Ganga, since the Vedic period, has been associated with piety, penance and intellectual and physical rejuvenation. We may have made astonishing progress over time and evolved into a modern society, but the river has not lost its essence.

Ambuja Realty's Ganga Kutir, located at Raichak, 35 km off Kolkata, on the bank of the river is an attempt to combine commercial enterprise and mental and spiritual well being. Ganga Kutir is the company`s first resort hotel and is a vibrant place for corporate honchos and the upwardly mobile. The resort and spa has 18 rooms at present and would have another 12 within a year.

The resort reflects Sri Lankan architectural brilliance and is a perfect destination for business leaders to brainstorm and evolve strategies, besides luxuriating in the verdant surrounding, with the river regurgitating through.

Harsh Neotia, Chairman, Ambuja Realty, told Financial Chronicle, "Ganga Kutir has been lovingly crafted by Channa Daswatte, who is one of Sri Lanka's leading architects, for those super achievers from different walks of life who have everything – except time. Time to indulge themselves and those they love."

Ganga Kutir offers gastronomic delights from around the world accompanied by an eclectic collection of spirits, a plethora of treatment options, including aromatherapy, ayurvedic, Swedish, Javanese and Thai massages, reflexology and stone therapy. Besides, it offers a cozy library and a 'bhavana madua' or meditation centre.

According to the Sri Lankan architect, the resort is themed after the structure of a small village or ashram community where the spaces in between the buildings become more important than the buildings themselves.

The entryway frames a space between the 'Mahawasala' or 'great house' on one side and kitchens on the other, which lead up to 'Magul Maduwa' or the 'space of celebration'.

"The form of the buildings themselves is one that is shared by all cultures in monsoon Asia. The steep tiled roofs allow for quick drain of monsoon showers, keeping it cool inside during summer. The material inspiration comes from Bengal itself.

Terracotta tiles, timber and plaster are the ubiquitous materials of the Gangetic delta. The shape of the terracotta roof tile comes from western Spain via the Arabs through southern India and Sri Lanka, a legacy of trade and exchange that has been the hallmark of the region, but made locally on the site," Neotia added.


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