Impart skills to people in rural areas to create jobs: Hinduja

To alleviate poverty and create more jobs, entrepreneurs should impart skills, particularly to people in rural areas in countries like India, Hinduja Foundation US Chairperson Shanu SP Hinduja has said.

Hinduja was invited to be the co-chair of the United Nation Foundation's Global Accelerator, which brought together entrepreneurs and the UN to accelerate global solutions on key Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the world's "to do list" to alleviate poverty.

The other co-chairs of the programme include computer giant Dell's Chairman Michael Dell, UN Under-Secretary General Peter Launsky-Tieffenthal, UN Foundation President and CEO Kathy Calvin and UN Foundation Entrepreneur-in-Residence Elizabeth Gore.

Addressing the subject of job creation and youth at the session here yesterday, Hinduja said that companies and entrepreneurs have the responsibility to impart skills for jobs to men and women, who in turn will be able to create value for the companies and businesses.

"We really need to take the aspect of teaching skills very seriously," she said.

She further stressed that companies and young entrepreneurs should "give jobs to the people who really need them, they should teach them the skills and help those who cannot find jobs by giving them the opportunity to start their own businesses."

She added that companies should not "just go after people who have the Harvard degrees but look out for people who really need the jobs".

Hinduja also stressed that foreign companies wanting to establish foothold in India should help impart skills to people in rural areas and create jobs there rather than just being focussed on the urban sectors.

"You will have economic growth but you will also be creating balance in society in a country that really needs it," she said, adding that any company that is going into a foreign land has to respect the local culture.

Hinduja noted that there are lots of skilled people who are not able to get employment.

She said governments, private businesses and banks could start thinking of giving such people small loans to help them create their businesses.

She also said that teaching skills to women, who have been out of the workforce, will give them the confidence to find work and help in the empowerment of their families.

"Companies should have sections just for giving skills for jobs. It will not hold people back," she added.


  • India can increase its GDP by letting women take as much part as men in the economy

    Women hold up half the sky. So said Mao Zedong. Now, McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) tells us that they can hold up more than half the sky.


Stay informed on our latest news!


Sarthak Raychaudhuri

vice-president, HR, Asia South Whirlpool of India

GV Nageswara Rao

MD & CEO, IDBI Federal Life

Timothy Moe

Goldman Sachs


Amita Sharma

Rank disorder in higher education

Two Indian institutes count among the wo­rld’s top 200 in ...

Zehra Naqvi

Little known gems

Fame, as they say, is a fickle mistress. And all ...

Bubbles Sabharwal

Harmony is a work in progress

Things, events, feelings, people... nothing has value attached to it, ...


William D. Green

Chairman & CEO, Accenture