HP India unveils Apollo server range,eyes research institutes

Tags: News
Tech giant Hewlett-Packard (HP) today unveiled its latest line up of servers -- Apollo 6000 and Apollo 8000 -- in India, which deliver enhanced performance using less space and energy.

The US-based computer maker is looking at the country's large base of engineering and research institutions for its next-generation servers.

"We at HP are working with our customers to understand their workloads and business outcome and based on that, we recommend to them the best possible solution," HP VP and General Manager (Asia Pacific and Japan) Servers Enterprise Group Stephen Bovis told reporters here.

Using HPC (high performance computing) technology, governments and academia can speed up their research by transitioning from physical laboratory to the digital world of simulations and computer analysis.

HP India Director (Servers) Vikram K said the latest announcement will seek to enhance the capabilities to hi-tech research and technology organisations to help them process data faster.

"Besides, they help organisations conserve space and power, thereby bringing in cost optimisation, which is a priority today," he added.

HP claims that the Apollo 8000 System is the world's first 100-per cent liquid-cooled supercomputer with built-in technology that protects the hardware.

"Built on a scalable rack design with up to 144 servers per rack, the system can offer four times the teraflops per rack compared to air-cooled designs, which helps eliminate up to 3,800 tonnes of carbon dioxide waste from the data centre per year," Bovis said.

The US National Renewable Energy Labs (NREL), which is using these solutions, expects to save $ 800,000 in operating expenses per year.

"Because we are capturing and using waste heat, we estimate we will save another $ 200,000 that would otherwise be used to heat the building. We are saving $ one million per year in operations costs for a data centre that cost less to build than a typical data centre," NREL Director Steve Hammond said.

The HP Apollo 6000 System features a flexible rack design that allows organisations to optimise their systems for variety of workloads like design automation or financial service risk analysis.

To address the growing demand for HPC, the firm also introduced HP Helion Self-Service HPC, a private cloud solution based on the HP Helion OpenStack cloud platform that provides a self-service portal containing high performance compute resources via a user-friendly application interface.

Organisations have the option of self-managing the solution, or selecting HP to manage the system with a pay-for-use model.

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