Man to man

Day 8 goes macho. While Praia do Futuro explores a man’s love of his family and boyfriend, The Third Side of the River potrays a son’s hatred of his father

Man to man
It is time the government of India watch and learn how the Chinese, Koreans and other countries promote their films and film industries. Last minute, hurriedly put together efforts by novices will only drain the coffers without bringing in desired results.

The pre-gala reception for the Chinese film Black Coal, Thin Ice hosted by Fortissimo in the up market Soho House, Berlin, was attended by all the Chinese participants, the cast and crew of the film and buyers. It is time the Indian flag bearers to the forthcoming Cannes film festival and market put their act together without waiting for April to arrive.

The Brazilian film Praia do Futuro by Karim Ainouz is about Donato, the lifeguard on the Praia do Futuro beach. Two German bikers enter the treacherous waters to be swept away by the undercurrents. The lifeguard could save only Konrad. Madly in love with Konrad, Donato follows him to Berlin and forgets his family till one day an angry grown up brother knocks at his door.

The director explained that the film is a love story, a family story and a travel story. “Having the guts to leave everything behind and reinvent your life was the idea at the core of Praia does Futuro” he said. He wanted to create a male melodrama sans villains.

On the other hand, the Argentinean film The Third Side of the River by Celina Murga, set in a small town, captures the miniscule world of a family sensitively. Young Nicolas lives with his mother and younger siblings. His estranged father, Jorge, a respected doctor, prepares Nicolas to take over his medical practice and agricultural business. Nicolas obeys his father, but he hates him. He has seen his mother suffer because of Jorge’s double life. At one point Nicolas decides to make a choice and pursue his future.

The director, from the first frame, has managed to establish the strain between the father and son.

The director said the film’s title is fictional, something that she borrowed from a book title to narrate ‘a location that does not exist’.

In a patriarchal society in which the father wants his son to be a ‘man’, drinking, driving, womanising, playing with guns and asserting his responsibility, she was trying to narrate the story from the male point of view — that of the father and son. She added that the film portrays a character going through conflict.

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