Women smarter than men in using digital technologies

Tags: Knowledge
Technology has almost always been considered a male forte. Contrarily, women seem to be overtaking men in finding uses of evolving technologies. From smartphone usage to online banking and shopping, women are in the forefront of technology adoption.

Apart from enhancing user experience and improving security, eBay’s focus in India is to encourage more women shoppers online, says Abhimanyu Lal, head of category management of the world’s largest ecommerce company. Women’s purchasing power has been exponentially increasing over the years and they are now the largest purchasers online not only for themselves but also for the whole household.

One of India’s leading ecommerce companies FashionAndYou (F&Y) set up its business primarily on this premise. The site specialises on fashion retailing targeted only on women buyers. F&Y is a members-only lifestyle e-commerce company with over 36 lakh subscribers. Its portfolio includes fashion apparel, designer wear, accessories, footwear, watches, jewelry and home décor products.

Says Harish Bahl, chief executive officer of Smile group and chairman of F&Y: “My wife shops for the whole family and I’m sure that is the case with most families these days. They are discerning and make most of the major purchasing decisions for buying products across all categories. We started with a focus on women and would continue to do so because we only see more and more women coming online to shop.”

It’s not the internet-based shopping alone but also mobile phones that women are more hooked on to than men. According to a global internet and mobile penetration survey done by Cisco, over 60 per cent of global youngsters, especially women, subconsciously or compulsively check their smartphones for emails, texts or social media updates. Women are more driven to connect; about 85 per cent of them versus 63 per cent of men find themselves often compulsively checking their smartphone for updates. Over 40 per cent of respondents had said that they would go through a “withdrawal” effect and “would feel anxious, like part of me was missing” if they couldn’t check their smartphones constantly.

“This phenomenon of wanting to be connected always presents a colossal business opportunity. Companies can now target buyers with specific products and services,” says VC Gopalratnam, CIO (Globalisation) and vice president (IT) of Cisco.

shyamalaseetharaman@mydigitalfc.com

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